Projects

Comparative Effectiveness of Telemedicine to Detect Diabetic Retinopathy

This project expands upon our first core research project, the Tribal Visual Impairment Prevention Program, a community-based participatory research project, that was developed to provide preliminary information regarding the prevalence of eye diseases in Northwest American Indian/Alaska Native communities, to measure the quality of life benefits of providing eyeglasses; and to measure the impact of non-mydriatic cameras and telemedicine on preventing blindness from diabetic retinopathy.

The new project, the Comparative Effectiveness of Telemedicine to Detect Diabetic Retinopathy, will determine the comparative effectiveness of telemedicine to traditional surveillance methods (annual eye exams in eye care provider’s office) for detecting diabetic retinopathy.  It will address three critical gaps in knowledge:  1) the efficacy for detecting diabetic retinopathy with telemedicine and traditional surveillance methods; 2) the health behavior factors related to receiving annual diabetic eye examinations with telemedicine and traditional surveillance methods; and 3) the cost-effectiveness of telemedicine and traditional surveillance methods.

This project is lead by Principal Investigator, Steve Mansberger, MD, MPH, Devers Eye Institute, Associate Scientist, Director of Ophthalmic Clinical Trials, Veterans Hospital, Director of Glaucoma Services, OHSU Adjunct Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Clinical Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine.

Click here to view Dr. Mansberger's PPT presentation for 2011 American Public Health Association Conference.